Young Ones Records

Since, 1994, Mouse on Mars has evolved into one of the biggest electronic music exports from Germany. Their sound is both challenging and funny, complexly layered yet with a simple driving beat. They've not onl yfound their own distinctive voicebut they've remained a force to imaginative innovation for a decade. This is their 8th full-legth and contains 9 new tracks.
Since, 1994, Mouse on Mars has evolved into one of the biggest electronic music exports from Germany. Their sound is both challenging and funny, complexly layered yet with a simple driving beat. They've not onl yfound their own distinctive voicebut they've remained a force to imaginative innovation for a decade. This is their 8th full-legth and contains 9 new tracks.
790377013429
Mouse On Mars - Radical Connector

Details

Format: CD
Label: TJ
Catalog: 70134
Rel. Date: 08/24/2004
UPC: 790377013429

Radical Connector
Artist: Mouse On Mars
Format: CD
New: In Stock Used: In Stock
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Mine Is in Yours
2. Wipe That Sound
3. Spaceship
4. Send Me Shivers
5. Blood Comes
6. End, The
7. Detected Beats
8. All the Old Powers
9. Evoke an Object

More Info:

Since, 1994, Mouse on Mars has evolved into one of the biggest electronic music exports from Germany. Their sound is both challenging and funny, complexly layered yet with a simple driving beat. They've not onl yfound their own distinctive voicebut they've remained a force to imaginative innovation for a decade. This is their 8th full-legth and contains 9 new tracks.

Reviews:

A warning to avant-dance acts aiming for pop accessibility: it helps to understand the basic principles of catchiness. Mouse on Mars' longstanding tendency to keep their music on the experimental, dissonant side hasn't exactly prepared them to concoct less "challenging" (read: "more fun") dance music, and if Radical Connector fails (subtly as it does) it's because Andi Toma and Jan St. Werner have a hard time concocting a context for a decent hook. They have occasional brushes with dancefloor-ready excitement-"Spaceship" is chaos-theory house that sounds like a Basement Jaxx b-side trapped inside a pachinko machine, and "Send Me Shivers" is uncomplicated but glossily sophisticated disco that builds layer upon layer where the rest of the album simply churns. But the bulk of Radical Connector sounds like clever arrogance that underestimates the complexity of pop's groove apparatus. Beneath the twitchy, purring Erlend Oye/Gruff Rhys vocal approximations of "Mine Is in Yours," the look-busy knob-fiddling acid reflux "Blood Comes" and the interminable passive attack of "The End" are rhythms that plod in a sleepy post-Britpop meter, like the first drafts of songs eventually deleted from Blur's Think Tank. And yet, despite this stasis-happy approach to beats (pick a simple rhythm, milk it like a codeine-addled, joyless Daft Punk, toss in a bucketheap of clankety digital debris and wait for the envelope to push itself,) the album's a valiant effort. Hell, some of it's almost as innovative as "Toxic." "A warning to avant-dance acts aiming for pop accessibility: it helps to understand the basic principles of catchiness. Mouse on Mars' longstanding tendency to keep their music on the experimental, dissonant side hasn't exactly prepared them to concoct less ""challenging"" (read: ""more fun"") dance music, and if Radical Connector fails (subtly as it does) it's because Andi Toma and Jan St. Werner have a hard time concocting a context for a decent hook. They have occasional brushes with dancefloor-ready excitement-""Spaceship"" is chaos-theory house that sounds like a Basement Jaxx b-side trapped inside a pachinko machine, and ""Send Me Shivers"" is uncomplicated but glossily sophisticated disco that builds layer upon layer where the rest of the album simply churns. But the bulk of Radical Connector sounds like clever arrogance that underestimates the complexity of pop's groove apparatus. Beneath the twitchy, purring Erlend Oye/Gruff Rhys vocal approximations of ""Mine Is in Yours,"" the look-busy knob-fiddling acid reflux ""Blood Comes"" and the interminable passive attack of ""The End"" are rhythms that plod in a sleepy post-Britpop meter, like the first drafts of songs eventually deleted from Blur's Think Tank. And yet, despite this stasis-happy approach to beats (pick a simple rhythm, milk it like a codeine-addled, joyless Daft Punk, toss in a bucketheap of clankety digital debris and wait for the envelope to push itself,) the album's a valiant effort. Hell, some of it's almost as innovative as ""Toxic."" "
        
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