828765372428
Schizophrenic

Details

Format: CD
Label: Jive (USA)
Catalog: 53724
Genre: Rock/Pop
Rel. Date: 02/24/2004
UPC: 828765372428

Schizophrenic
Artist: Jc Chasez
Format: CD
New: call store to check stock 610-683-5599
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Reviews:

The final six cuts of JC Chasez's solo debut are exactly what you'd expect -a boy-band alum slacking through his post-graduate year. He sighs corny lines ("She loves daffodils/ She keeps them on her windowsill/ When the wind blows the smell fills the room") over an adult-contemporary arrangement (acoustic guitars + drum machines) on "Lose Myself," self-consciously vies for tags like "edgy," "hip" and "Lenny Kravitz" on "If You Were My Girl," and does a killer Sting impression on "Everything You Want." Trim Schizophrenic to its first ten cuts, however, and you have not only one of post-Thriller pop's most ambitious and exhilarating records, but a gleefully unfocused work that outshines bandmate Justin Timberlake's accomplished Justified.

Schizophrenic brims with bald-faced, Plastic Ono Band-sized departures from Chasez's *NSYNC days. On the outrageously immature "A.D.I.D.A.S." he chants "All day long I dream about sex with you" atop an arrangement, courtesy of longtime *NSYNC producer Alex G, that sounds like Joy Division with a major label budget. At one point, JC hilariously barks, "School's back in session," before instructing his pupils to "get ready for a lesson" that apparently includes twee handclapping, and the extended instrumental coda suggests a post-punk treatment of the Mortal Kombat theme. "Come to Me" also mines the early '80s-this time the warm detachment of post-disco pop, as Giorgio Moroder's trademark see-saw keyboards flirt with Chasez's feathery vocals for what sounds like peak Donna Summer-and the lead-off single "Some Girls (Dance With Women)" chases after grrrls who only go wild 'cause they know "that it gets them attention" with the keyboard riff from the Cure's "Close to Me."

Chasez one-ups Justified, and its singular focus on early '80s Michael Jackson-derived dance-pop, by peppering Schizophrenic with house, southern hip-hop, punk, goth synth-pop and R&B, sometimes all at once. On "100 Ways" former Paula Abdul producer Robb Boldt builds off of a riff that's alternately Beck's "Devil's Haircut," neutered ZZ Top and twanged-out Alan Jackson to create country hip-hop with a post-hardcore, sung-screeched bridge, palm-muted garage-rock verses and a Chili Peppers chorus. Such ridiculous reaches obviously have the makings of a 54-genre pile-up, but the breadth of Chasez's vocal talents (despite his shaky screamo) somehow holds it together.

For all of Schizophrenic's bridge-burning, however, the most immediate and potentially biggest cut, "Build My World," is pure *NSYNC balladry. Shyly chiming over a broken, jerking sample in the wavering verses, Chasez sounds as punch-drunk by his quest ("I'll be the lonely one/ Until I find someone/ To build my world around") as Frodo gazing wearily across Mordor. It's never easy to leave the Shire, even as an absurdly rich, oversized hobbit, but, Gandalf willing, Middle Earth could soon belong to JC.

"The final six cuts of JC Chasez's solo debut are exactly what you'd expect -a boy-band alum slacking through his post-graduate year. He sighs corny lines (""She loves daffodils/ She keeps them on her windowsill/ When the wind blows the smell fills the room"") over an adult-contemporary arrangement (acoustic guitars + drum machines) on ""Lose Myself,"" self-consciously vies for tags like ""edgy,"" ""hip"" and ""Lenny Kravitz"" on ""If You Were My Girl,"" and does a killer Sting impression on ""Everything You Want."" Trim Schizophrenic to its first ten cuts, however, and you have not only one of post-Thriller pop's most ambitious and exhilarating records, but a gleefully unfocused work that outshines bandmate Justin Timberlake's accomplished Justified.

Schizophrenic brims with bald-faced, Plastic Ono Band-sized departures from Chasez's *NSYNC days. On the outrageously immature ""A.D.I.D.A.S."" he chants ""All day long I dream about sex with you"" atop an arrangement, courtesy of longtime *NSYNC producer Alex G, that sounds like Joy Division with a major label budget. At one point, JC hilariously barks, ""School's back in session,"" before instructing his pupils to ""get ready for a lesson"" that apparently includes twee handclapping, and the extended instrumental coda suggests a post-punk treatment of the Mortal Kombat theme. ""Come to Me"" also mines the early '80s-this time the warm detachment of post-disco pop, as Giorgio Moroder's trademark see-saw keyboards flirt with Chasez's feathery vocals for what sounds like peak Donna Summer-and the lead-off single ""Some Girls (Dance With Women)"" chases after grrrls who only go wild 'cause they know ""that it gets them attention"" with the keyboard riff from the Cure's ""Close to Me.""

Chasez one-ups Justified, and its singular focus on early '80s Michael Jackson-derived dance-pop, by peppering Schizophrenic with house, southern hip-hop, punk, goth synth-pop and R&B, sometimes all at once. On ""100 Ways"" former Paula Abdul producer Robb Boldt builds off of a riff that's alternately Beck's ""Devil's Haircut,"" neutered ZZ Top and twanged-out Alan Jackson to create country hip-hop with a post-hardcore, sung-screeched bridge, palm-muted garage-rock verses and a Chili Peppers chorus. Such ridiculous reaches obviously have the makings of a 54-genre pile-up, but the breadth of Chasez's vocal talents (despite his shaky screamo) somehow holds it together.

For all of Schizophrenic's bridge-burning, however, the most immediate and potentially biggest cut, ""Build My World,"" is pure *NSYNC balladry. Shyly chiming over a broken, jerking sample in the wavering verses, Chasez sounds as punch-drunk by his quest (""I'll be the lonely one/ Until I find someone/ To build my world around"") as Frodo gazing wearily across Mordor. It's never easy to leave the Shire, even as an absurdly rich, oversized hobbit, but, Gandalf willing, Middle Earth could soon belong to JC.

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